Hemp facts.


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Levi jeans were originally made from hemp sailcloth.
Chris Martin Chris Martin

Levi jeans were originally made from hemp sailcloth.

Levi jeans were originally made from hemp sailcloth, for goldminers in California, who would fill their pockets with gold.⁣⁣⁣⁣Before Levi’s first invented the 501s, their iconic jeans were actually crafted from hemp.

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Hemp can remove harmful chemicals, heavy metals and radioactive toxins from the soil.
Chris Martin Chris Martin

Hemp can remove harmful chemicals, heavy metals and radioactive toxins from the soil.

Labelled a "mop-crop", industrial hemp can be used to clean up metals, pesticides, solvents, explosives, crude oil, and toxins leaching from landfills. Hemp and it's phytoremediative properties can also be used to remove radioactive elements from the soil, having demonstrated the ability to decontaminate toxic soils in Chernobyl in the aftermath of the nuclear disaster. ⁣⁠

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Myth: Hemp clothing is itchy
Chris Martin Chris Martin

Myth: Hemp clothing is itchy

Hemp clothing is actually very soft and it keeps getting softer over time. The more hemp is worn, the softer it gets: wearing in, not out. Hemp thrives on regular use and washing, which improves its natural lustre and feel. Hemp sheds a natural microscopic layer of plant fibre each time it's washed, which exposes a fresh surface, allowing hemp to retain its sleek sheen.⁣⁣⁠

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Did you know in 1904 the T-Shirt was originally marketed at bachelors who couldn't sew or replace buttons.
Chris Martin Chris Martin

Did you know in 1904 the T-Shirt was originally marketed at bachelors who couldn't sew or replace buttons.

In 1904, the Cooper Underwear Company ran a magazine ad announcing a new product for bachelors. In the 'before' photo, an embarrassed man he has lost all the buttons on his undershirt and has safety-pinned it together. In the 'after' photo, a gentleman sports a handlebar mustache smokes a cigar and wears a “bachelor undershirt” stretchy enough to be pulled over the head. “No safety pins — no buttons — no needle — no thread,” ran the slogan aimed at men with no wives and no sewing skills.

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Hemp is naturally antibacterial and antifungal
Chris Martin Chris Martin

Hemp is naturally antibacterial and antifungal

The use of plants in remedies and medicines has a long history. Some natural fibre plants, especially hemp, are regarded to possess antibacterial activity against a wide range of pathogenic bacteria. ⁣

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Do you know the connection between beer hops and hemp?
Chris Martin Chris Martin

Do you know the connection between beer hops and hemp?

Once upon a time, cannabis and humulus (commonly known as hops; one of the main ingredients in beer) were the same plant.⁣⁣ About 27 million years ago, cannabis and hops diverged from their common ancestor and evolved as separate botanical species.⁣⁣

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Hemp was the second most used material in shipbuilding after wood
Chris Martin Chris Martin

Hemp was the second most used material in shipbuilding after wood

Hemp's high resistance to degradation from salt water and sunlight, and its natural UV protection makes hemp clothing perfect for the sun and sea. This high resistance to rotting and superior strength led to hemp's premier use in marine fittings throughout history. ⁣

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Hemp keeps you warm in winter and cool in summer
Chris Martin Chris Martin

Hemp keeps you warm in winter and cool in summer

Hemp is a great natural insulator. ⁣The unique, porous (hollow, capillary-like) structure of the hemp fibre means hemp clothing produces the combination effect of breathability while being able to insulate at the same time.⁣

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Hemp was the first plant to be domestically cultivated
Chris Martin Chris Martin

Hemp was the first plant to be domestically cultivated

Hemp is an ancient plant that has been cultivated for millennia. It's suggested that the weaving of hemp fibre began over 10,000 years ago. It's suggested that the use of wild hemp dates as far back as 8000 BC, with archaeologists having found remnant hemp cloth and rope dating back to this time period from ancient Mesopotamia.⁣

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Is your clothing toxic?
Chris Martin Chris Martin

Is your clothing toxic?

Worldwide, conventionally-grown cotton production utilises approximately 25% of the world's total insecticides and 10% of the world's pesticides, although only grown on 3% of the world's crop-based agricultural land. Each year cotton producers around the world use nearly $2.6billion worth of pesticides. "Conventionally grown cotton uses more insecticides than any other single crop and epitomizes the worst effects of chemically dependent agriculture" (Pesticide Action Network North America).⁣⁣⁣⁣
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How much plastic is our clothing sending out to sea?
Chris Martin Chris Martin

How much plastic is our clothing sending out to sea?

We frequently talk of single-use plastics and the current worldwide efforts to reduce the use of these plastic products which end up in our oceans, but as we seek solutions to the issue of plastic pollution, we need to acknowledge that our clothing is a major part of the problem. ⁣⁣⁣

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Hemp can help save our forests
Chris Martin Chris Martin

Hemp can help save our forests

Deforestation is increasing across the planet at an alarming rate. Research suggests that the rate of deforestation is equivalent to a loss of approximately 48 football fields every minute, adding up to an area equivalent to the size of Italy each year (Global Forest Watch, 2017).⁣

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Why did hemp disappear?
Chris Martin Chris Martin

Why did hemp disappear?

Hemp is an ancient plant that has been cultivated for thousands of years. Up until the 1920s hemp was a commodity of significant economic and social value. Hemp was the desired fibre to manufacture clothing, rope, canvas and paper – 80% of all textiles were made with hemp. Similarly, hemp paper was the main medium for the spreading of literary, philosophical and scientific texts of these early times. ⁣

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The CO2 Superhero
Chris Martin Chris Martin

The CO2 Superhero

Hemp is a vital natural carbon sink for reducing pollution. Hemp is unmatched in its ability to sequester (absorb and trap) carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. ⁣

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Hemp can clean up soil pollution
Chris Martin Chris Martin

Hemp can clean up soil pollution

Not only does hemp rehabilitate and enrich the soil with nitrogen and oxygen, restore pH levels and combat erosion, industrial hemp can also naturally clean and detoxify soils that are contaminated with toxic substances and pollutants. Called 'phytoremediation', industrial hemp has a very high capability to absorb heavy metals like lead, nickel, cadmium, zinc and chromium. ⁣⁣

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